Monday 13th April

April 13th

Colossians 3. 1-4     The New Life in Christ

3So if you have been raised with Christ, seek the things that are above, where Christ is, seated at the right hand of God. 2Set your minds on things that are above, not on things that are on earth, 3for you have died, and your life is hidden with Christ in God. 4When Christ who is your life is revealed, then you also will be revealed with him in glory.

 

Gerald Manley Hopkins – from ‘the Wreck of the Deutschland’

Our Kíng back, Oh, upon énglish sóuls!

Let him easter in us, be a dayspring to the dimness of us, be a crimson-cresseted east,

More brightening her, rare-dear Britain, as his reign rolls,

Pride, rose, prince, hero of us, high-priest,

Our hearts' charity's hearth's fire, our thoughts' chivalry's throng's Lord.

 

 

The Collect for Easter week:

God of glory,

by the raising of your Son

you have broken the chains of death and hell:

Fill your Church with faith and hope;

for a new day has dawned

and the way to life stands open

in our Saviour Jesus Christ. Amen.

 

 

Pope Francis Easter Vigil homily (quoting from John 20)

“This year we are experiencing, more than ever, the great silence of Holy Saturday.  We can imagine ourselves in the position of the women on that day.  They, like us, had before their eyes the drama of suffering, of an unexpected tragedy that happened all too suddenly.  They had seen death and it weighed on their hearts.  Pain was mixed with fear: would they suffer the same fate as the Master?  Then too there was fear about the future and all that would need to be rebuilt.  A painful memory, a hope cut short.  For them, as for us, it was the darkest hour.

Yet in this situation the women did not allow themselves to be paralyzed.  They did not give in to the gloom of sorrow and regret, they did not morosely close in on themselves, or flee from reality.  They were doing something simple yet extraordinary: preparing at home the spices to anoint the body of Jesus.  They did not stop loving; in the darkness of their hearts, they lit a flame of mercy.  Our Lady spent that Saturday, the day that would be dedicated to her, in prayer and hope.  She responded to sorrow with trust in the Lord.  Unbeknownst to these women, they were making preparations, in the darkness of that Sabbath, for “the dawn of the first day of the week”, the day that would change history.  Jesus, like a seed buried in the ground, was about to make new life blossom in the world; and these women, by prayer and love, were helping to make that hope flower.  How many people, in these sad days, have done and are still doing what those women did, sowing seeds of hope!  With small gestures of care, affection and prayer.

At dawn the women went to the tomb.  There the angel says to them: “Do not be afraid. He is not here; for he has risen” (vv. 5-6).  They hear the words of life even as they stand before a tomb... And then they meet Jesus, the giver of all  hope, who confirms the message and says: “Do not be afraid” (v. 10).  Do not be afraiddo not yield to fear:  This is the message of hope.  It is addressed to us, today.  These are the words that God repeats to us today, this very night.

Tonight we acquire a fundamental right that can never be taken away from us: the right to hope.  It is a new and living hope that comes from God.  It is not mere optimism; it is not a pat on the back or an empty word of encouragement, with a passing smile. No.  It is a gift from heaven, which we could not have earned on our own.  Over these weeks, we have kept repeating, “All will be well”, clinging to the beauty of our humanity and allowing words of encouragement to rise up from our hearts.  But as the days go by and fears grow, even the boldest hope can dissipate.  Jesus’ hope is different.  He plants in our hearts the conviction that God is able to make everything work unto good, because even from the grave he brings life.

The grave is the place where no one who enters ever leaves.  But Jesus emerged for us; he rose for us, to bring life where there was death, to begin a new story in the very place where a stone had been placed.  He, who rolled away the stone that sealed the entrance of the tomb, can also remove the stones in our hearts.  So, let us not give in to resignation; let us not place a stone before hope.  We can and must hope, because God is faithful.  He did not abandon us; he visited us and entered into our situations of pain, anguish and death.  His light dispelled the darkness of the tomb: today he wants that light to penetrate even to the darkest corners of our lives.  Dear sister, dear brother, even if in your heart you have buried hope, do not give up: God is greater.  Darkness and death do not have the last word.  Be strong, for with God nothing is lost!”

 

 

Archbishop Welby on the Andrew Marr show – 25 minute interview… (starts 52 minutes and 45 seconds into the show)

https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/m000hbpp/the-andrew-marr-show-12042020

 

 

The English National Opera celebrating NHS using Gilbert and Sullivan song “For he is an Englishman”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6sUYKK30djo

 

 

Easter jokes for family and friends (collected by Bridgette Nulty)

 

  • What’s the Easter bunny’s favourite kind of music?

Hip-Hop.

  • What do you call a rabbit with fleas?
    Bugs Bunny.
  • What did one Easter egg say to another?

Heard any good yolks today?

  • What do you get if you pour boiling water down a rabbit hole?

Hot, cross bunnies.

  • Why shouldn’t you tell an Easter egg a good joke?
    It might crack up!
  • What kind of jewellery do rabbits wear?
    24 carrot gold.
  • How does the Easter bunny stay fit?
    Lots of eggs-ercise.
  • What do you call a mischievous Easter egg?

A practical yolker.

  • Why was the Easter bunny upset when he looked in a mirror?

He was having a bad hare day.

  • What do you call a line of rabbits jumping backwards?

A receding hare-line.

  • Why do we paint Easter eggs?
    Because it’s a lot easier than trying to wallpaper them.
  • What’s the difference between a crazy rabbit and a counterfeit £10 note?

One’s bad money and the other is a mad bunny!

  • Who is the Easter bunny’s favourite movie star?

Rabbit de Niro.


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